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Fall 2022
CLASSICS

CLAS 510A – Methods in Classical Studies
Introduction to the various disciplines of classical scholarship: philology, textual criticism, paleography, papyrology, archaeology.

Section 001
Days MoWe
Location Learn Srvc Bldg, Rm 246
Time 8:30 AM - 9:45 AM
Instructor Courtney Friesen
Date Aug 22 - Dec 7
Status Open
Enrollment 6 / 20
  • Days: MoWe
  • Location: Learn Srvc Bldg, Rm 246
  • Time: 8:30 AM
  • Dates: Aug 22 - Dec 7
  • Status: Open
  • Enrollment: 6 / 20

CLAS 510B – Thesis Preparation
This course is an introduction to thesis writing for students enrolled in the Master of Arts degree program in Classics. Topics and/or assignments include forming a thesis committee, the review of scholarship, and developing a thesis writing plan, in addition to discussion of second-year issues such as applying for PhD programs and/or jobs in Classics.

Section 001
Days We
Location Learn Srvc Bldg, Rm 246
Time 12:00 PM - 12:50 PM
Instructor Courtney Friesen
Date Aug 22 - Dec 7
Status Open
Enrollment 11 / 12
  • Days: We
  • Location: Learn Srvc Bldg, Rm 246
  • Time: 12:00 PM
  • Dates: Aug 22 - Dec 7
  • Status: Open
  • Enrollment: 11 / 12

CLAS 546A – Mapping Ancient Cities
  • Cross Listed
  • The course will introduce the student to the history, theory and archaeological evidence for city and landscape planning from the Minoan, Etruscan, Greek and Roman periods. In addition the course will consider some of the most modern techniques (digital cartography, remote sensing and GIS) in the study of ancient cities and will offer the student the opportunity to learn and practice a number of these modern techniques, including the use of AutoCAD. Graduate-level requirements include making a 30 minute oral presentation to the class on the research project undertaken as a part of the requirements for the course. In addition, graduate students will be responsible for a 25 page paper.

    Section 001
    Days MoWe
    Location Haury Anthro Bldg, Rm 408A
    Time 3:30 PM - 4:45 PM
    Instructor David Romano
    Date Aug 22 - Dec 7
    Status Open
    Enrollment 13 / 30
    • Days: MoWe
    • Location: Haury Anthro Bldg, Rm 408A
    • Time: 3:30 PM
    • Dates: Aug 22 - Dec 7
    • Status: Open
    • Enrollment: 13 / 30

    CLAS 554 – Greek and Roman Sculpture: Symbols and Society in Antiquity
  • Cross Listed
  • This course surveys Greek and Roman sculpture from Cycladic figurines of the 3rd millennium B.C. to Roman sculpture of ca. 300 A.D. Topics to be addressed are stylistic developments, uses of sculpture within historical settings, iconography and meaning, materials and manufacturing techniques, and sculptors and their social status. The course will also deal with modern misconceptions of the original appearance of the classical sculpture, problems of forgeries, and the impact of looting within larger discussions of cultural heritage and collecting.

    Section 001
    Days TuTh
    Location Phys-Atmos Sci, Rm 412
    Time 12:30 PM - 1:45 PM
    Instructor Irene Romano
    Date Aug 22 - Dec 7
    Status Open
    Enrollment 18 / 25
    • Days: TuTh
    • Location: Phys-Atmos Sci, Rm 412
    • Time: 12:30 PM
    • Dates: Aug 22 - Dec 7
    • Status: Open
    • Enrollment: 18 / 25

    CLAS 556 – Greek and Roman Painting
  • Cross Listed
  • This course surveys the craft and context of Greek and Roman painting and mosaics, from the Bronze Age Greek palaces to the Archaic and Classical Greek ceramics, to Etruscan tombs and Roman villas. Greeks and Romans lived both privately and publicly in a colorful world with lavishly decorated walls, floors, ceramics, sculpture, and luxury objects. Topics also include professional competition among painters, transfer of technological knowledge, and scientific analysis of pigments. Graduate-level requirements include extensive reading and an in-depth paper.

    Section 101
    Days
    Location Online
    Time 5:00 PM - 5:00 PM
    Instructor Howard Soren
    Date Aug 22 - Dec 7
    Status Open
    Enrollment 29 / 30
    • Days:
    • Location: Online
    • Time: 5:00 PM
    • Dates: Aug 22 - Dec 7
    • Status: Open
    • Enrollment: 29 / 30
    GREEK

    GRK 522 – Readings in Greek Drama
    Close reading in Greek of either (1) tragedy-one play each by Aeschylus, Sophocles and Euripides or (2) comedy-two plays of Aristophanes, one of Menander. Graduate-level requirements include extensive reading and an in-depth paper.

    Section 001
    Days MoWe
    Location Education, Rm 535
    Time 2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
    Instructor Courtney Friesen
    Date Aug 22 - Dec 7
    Status Open
    Enrollment 13 / 25
    • Days: MoWe
    • Location: Education, Rm 535
    • Time: 2:00 PM
    • Dates: Aug 22 - Dec 7
    • Status: Open
    • Enrollment: 13 / 25
    LATIN

    LAT 515 – Latin Love Elegy
    Reading in the Latin texts of Ovid, Tibullus and Propertius. Graduate-level requirements include extensive reading and a research paper.

    Section 001
    Days TuTh
    Location Modern Languages, Rm 212
    Time 3:30 PM - 4:45 PM
    Instructor Sarah McCallum
    Date Aug 22 - Dec 7
    Status Open
    Enrollment 10 / 20
    • Days: TuTh
    • Location: Modern Languages, Rm 212
    • Time: 3:30 PM
    • Dates: Aug 22 - Dec 7
    • Status: Open
    • Enrollment: 10 / 20

    LAT 526 – Roman Historians
    Readings in Latin from the Roman historians and biographers. May be repeated without duplication of readings. Graduate-level requirements include extensive readings and a research paper.

    Section 002
    Days MoWe
    Location Social Sciences, Rm 118
    Time 5:00 PM - 6:15 PM
    Instructor Philip Waddell
    Date Aug 22 - Dec 7
    Status Open
    Enrollment 11 / 20
    • Days: MoWe
    • Location: Social Sciences, Rm 118
    • Time: 5:00 PM
    • Dates: Aug 22 - Dec 7
    • Status: Open
    • Enrollment: 11 / 20

    LAT 579 – Second/Foreign Language Teaching and Learning
  • Cross Listed
  • This class is intended to prepare students to teach a second/foreign language. It will provide students with the essential foundations in language teaching methodology and theory, pedagogical grammar, curriculum and materials development, classroom management, and formal and informal assessment techniques. In addition, students will gain practical knowledge through video practicum components, which allow them to watch and reflect on actual classroom teaching. Students will complete this program with the pedagogical knowledge and practical understanding necessary to be confident and effective language teachers.

    Section 001
    Days We
    Location Mines & Metallurgy, Rm 213
    Time 3:30 PM - 6:00 PM
    Instructor Janice McGregor
    Date Aug 22 - Dec 7
    Status Open
    Enrollment 19 / 25
    • +
    • Section: 001
    • Instructor:Janice McGregor
    • Days: We
    • Location: Mines & Metallurgy, Rm 213
    • Time: 3:30 PM
    • Dates: Aug 22 - Dec 7
    • Status: Open
    • Enrollment: 19 / 25
    Spring 2023
    CLASSICS

    CLAS 501A – Early Christian Literature: Greek Texts
  • Cross Listed
  • Writing Emphasis Course
  • This course involves in depth study of early Christian texts together with related contemporary Jewish and Greco-Roman literature. Students will engage in careful analysis of individual texts in the New Testament and from the first four centuries of the Common Era, focusing on questions of genre, authorship, and meaning. Alongside these, students will examine writings by contemporary Jewish, Greek, and Roman authors (e.g., Philo, Josephus, Seneca, and Plutarch) as illustrative of the wider literary and religious culture. For students who have completed GRK 201, an option for readings in ancient Greek will be available as part of the course. Graduate level requirements included a extended research papers drawing on appropriate levels of training in language, literature, and knowledge of the ancient world.

    Section 001
    Days TuTh
    Location Mines & Metallurgy, Rm 213
    Time 11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
    Instructor Courtney Friesen
    Date Jan 11 - May 3
    Status Open
    Enrollment 0 / 22
    • Days: TuTh
    • Location: Mines & Metallurgy, Rm 213
    • Time: 11:00 AM
    • Dates: Jan 11 - May 3
    • Status: Open
    • Enrollment: 0 / 22

    CLAS 504C – Cleopatra: Power, Passion, Propaganda
  • Cross Listed
  • This course focuses on Cleopatra VII (69-30 BCE), the last ruler of Ptolemaic Egypt and one of the best-known women in history and a key powerbroker during a period of important political change, one with enduring repercussions for the western world. She has been, however, deliberately memorialized as a "romantic" agent, a deployer of "feminine wiles", whose gender and political toolbox rightly doomed her efforts to failure. Students will interrogate the process of transforming a historical individual into an object lesson, a trope of femininity, and a cinematic legend, unpacking the messages crafted for a range of audiences and purposes by multiple creators, including Cleopatra herself. We begin with the historical background of the Hellenistic period, cosmopolitan and multicultural, focusing especially on the dynamism of women in the ideology of royal power and as image-makers in their own right, developing special forms for female authority and female patronage. A number of earlier Cleopatras establish context and particular precedents, creating official personae to engage effective interactions with fundamental groups; these include the resilient Ptolemaic queen Cleopatra II (r. 175-116 BCE) and Cleopatra Thea, token in a dynastic alliance who became Great Queen of Syria, dominating the Seleucid throne for a generation. Students will then sift through the evidence for Cleopatra VII, both the contentious (and largely hostile) material for her Mediterranean activities as well as the Egyptian record that may represent the specific efforts of the queen herself, utilizing then-ancient symbol and ritual to assert her legitimate imperial authority and structure her collaboration with major stakeholders in the Nile realm. The last section of the course looks to the lingering memory of Cleopatra long after her death, closely examining images in drama, art, and film to explore how the story of Cleopatra has been crafted and recrafted to represent different "truths" about sex, power, and identity. Graduate-level requirements include two short in-class presentations on particular aspects of course material; weekly responses to the assigned reading, focusing on modern scholarship; and a 5000-word final paper, comparative in nature.

    Section 001
    Days TuTh
    Location C E Chavez Bldg, Rm 406A
    Time 11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
    Instructor Alison Futrell
    Date Jan 11 - May 3
    Status Closed
    Enrollment 0 / 24
    • Days: TuTh
    • Location: C E Chavez Bldg, Rm 406A
    • Time: 11:00 AM
    • Dates: Jan 11 - May 3
    • Status: Closed
    • Enrollment: 0 / 24

    CLAS 520 – Archaic Greek Sanctuaries
  • Cross Listed
  • This course concentrates on the evidence for Greek sanctuary sites between 1000 and 600 B.C. We examine the excavated material from numerous sanctuary sites, including architectural remains (temples and/or altars), votive offerings of bronze and clay, and any other evidence revealing religious practices during these formative years. The role the sanctuaries played in society is also considered with a view to their political, social, economic and spiritual implications for Archaic Greek life. Graduate-level requirements include a more extensive paper than undergraduates.

    Section 001
    Days Tu
    Location Modern Languages, Rm 213
    Time 3:30 PM - 6:00 PM
    Instructor David Romano
    Date Jan 11 - May 3
    Status Open
    Enrollment 0 / 15
    • Days: Tu
    • Location: Modern Languages, Rm 213
    • Time: 3:30 PM
    • Dates: Jan 11 - May 3
    • Status: Open
    • Enrollment: 0 / 15

    CLAS 532 – Literary Translation as Classical Reception
    This course examines the translation of classical (poetic) texts as a way of receiving these texts and rendering them accessible - and fresh - for new audiences. The course consists of five components: (1) an introduction to the field of Translation Studies; (2) diachronic study of some of the most influential writers on translation, i.e. from Cicero to 21st century theorists; (3) the translation and adaptation of Greek texts by Latin authors at the beginnings of Latin literature; (4) close study of selected Greek and Latin poetic texts against a selection of published translations of them in English; (5) translation practica. Graduate level requirements include readings in both Greek & Latin, an oral report, and more extensive practica.

    Section 001
    Days Th
    Location Modern Languages, Rm 204
    Time 3:30 PM - 6:00 PM
    Instructor David Christenson
    Date Jan 11 - May 3
    Status Open
    Enrollment 0 / 20
    • Days: Th
    • Location: Modern Languages, Rm 204
    • Time: 3:30 PM
    • Dates: Jan 11 - May 3
    • Status: Open
    • Enrollment: 0 / 20

    CLAS 565 – Greek Pottery: Craft and Society in Ancient Greece
  • Cross Listed
  • This course surveys the development of ancient Greek pottery from c. 3000 to 400 BCE, with a focus on the period 1200-400 BCE (Mycenaean-Late Classical). Topics to be addressed include stylistic and typological developments, uses of ceramics within historical settings, iconography and meaning, materials and manufacturing techniques, organization of ceramic workshops, and potters and their social status. Key goals of the course include gaining an appreciation for the great importance of pottery in establishing and verifying the foundations of chronology in Greek archaeology as well as illuminating fundamental aspects of Greek society and culture. Opportunities for hands-on experiences in UA ceramics labs and museum collections will be available. Graduate-level requirements include extensive readings and an in-depth paper.

    Section 001
    Days MoWe
    Location Haury Anthro Bldg, Rm 215
    Time 9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
    Instructor Eleni Hasaki
    Date Jan 11 - May 3
    Status Open
    Enrollment 0 / 30
    • Days: MoWe
    • Location: Haury Anthro Bldg, Rm 215
    • Time: 9:30 AM
    • Dates: Jan 11 - May 3
    • Status: Open
    • Enrollment: 0 / 30

    CLAS 587 – Assessment in Second/Foreign Language Learning
  • Cross Listed
  • The primary objective of this course is the development of language teachers' assessment literacy, which includes knowledge of key assessment principles and skill in creating or adopting assessment tools and procedures for the language classroom. Participants in this course will develop their knowledge and skills related to assessing all skill areas in the language classroom, including productive skills (writing, speaking), receptive skills (reading, listening), and assessing grammar and vocabulary. Grading and student evaluation will also be important topics of consideration and exploration in this course. Designed specifically for in-service (and pre-service) language teachers, the course combines theory with practice by covering essential principles of effective classroom assessment and the development of effective assessment tools for classroom use. Participants completing this course will become more assessment literate and better able to evaluate student performance in their classrooms fairly and effectively.

    Section 001
    Days Mo
    Location Modern Languages, Rm 201
    Time 3:30 PM - 6:00 PM
    Instructor Janice McGregor
    Date Jan 11 - May 3
    Status Open
    Enrollment 0 / 15
    • +
    • Section: 001
    • Instructor:Janice McGregor
    • Days: Mo
    • Location: Modern Languages, Rm 201
    • Time: 3:30 PM
    • Dates: Jan 11 - May 3
    • Status: Open
    • Enrollment: 0 / 15
    GREEK

    GRK 533 – Readings in Ancient Greek Poetry of the Archaic and/or Hellenistic Period
    Critical readings in ancient Greek with literary and social-historical contextual analyses of ancient Greek Poetry of either the Archaic or Hellenistic period or both. Graduate-level requirements include extensive reading and a research paper.

    Section 001
    Days MoWe
    Location Biol Sci East, Rm 314
    Time 2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
    Instructor Arum Park
    Date Jan 11 - May 3
    Status Open
    Enrollment 0 / 22
    • Days: MoWe
    • Location: Biol Sci East, Rm 314
    • Time: 2:00 PM
    • Dates: Jan 11 - May 3
    • Status: Open
    • Enrollment: 0 / 22
    LATIN

    LAT 501 – Latin Reading Course
    Readings in one of the following: epic, lyric, drama, history, oratory, satire, epistles, novel, philosophical, technical or medieval literature. Graduate-level requirements include extensive reading and a research paper.

    Section 001
    Days TuTh
    Location R P Harvill Bldg, Rm 234
    Time 2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
    Instructor Sarah McCallum
    Date Jan 11 - May 3
    Status Open
    Enrollment 0 / 25
    • Days: TuTh
    • Location: R P Harvill Bldg, Rm 234
    • Time: 2:00 PM
    • Dates: Jan 11 - May 3
    • Status: Open
    • Enrollment: 0 / 25