waddell

Image
Waddell headshot
waddell@arizona.edu
Office
Learning Services Building
Office Hours
By appointment
Waddell, Philip
Associate Professor

Areas of Expertise

  • Latin and Greek historiography, especially of Rome
  • Roman and Greek history
  • Ancient Rhetoric

Summer '24 Courses

  • LAT 112 Intensive Beginning Latin
  • LAT 212 Accelerated Latin II

Education

  • Ph.D., Classical Studies, University of Missouri (2010)
    • Dissertation: "The Directed Gaze: Enargeia and Film in the Annales of Tacitus"
      • Dennis Trout (Chair), Raymond Marks, James McGlew, David Schenker, Lawrence Okamura
  • M.A, Classics, University of Missouri (2006)
  • Postbaccalaurate work in Classics, The Catholic University of America (2001-2002)
  • B.A., History, cum laude, The Johns Hopkins University (2001)
    • Thesis: "The Religious Reforms of Augustus"
      • Celia Schultz (Chair)

Selected Presentations

  • 2024 "The Dream of Hannibal: Propaganda, Religion, and Historiography," ACL, Tucson.
  • 2024 "Livius Criticus: A Polybian Intertext at AUC 21.18-19," CAMWS, St. Louis.
  • 2020 "The Imperial Gaze: Focalization and Alignment in Tacitus' Annales" (invited lecture) University of Toronto, October 2020.
  • 2020 "Cupido incessit: Religion at the Borders of Empire (Tac. Hist. 2.2–3, Ann. 1.61–62.)," (invited panel: "The Supernatural in Tacitus,") CAMWS, March 2020.* (Presented in May, for Online CAMWS)
  • 2018 "Reading Nero: Receptions of the Emperor from Antiquity to the 21st Century," Hendrix College, AR (invited).
  • 2017 "Urbs ut scaena: Dramatic Space in the Historiae of Tacitus," CAMWS, Kitchener, ON.
  • 2015 “Quasi Nero Triumphans: A Tacitean Reading of Ammianus Marcellinus’ RG 16.8-10,” CAMWS, Boulder.
  • 2014 “Carthago Deleta: Alternate Realities and Meta-history in Appian’s Libyca,” Science/Fiction/History: The Literary in Classical Historiography, Athens, Greece.
  • 2014 “In Your Hearts:  A Ciceronian Intertext in Tacitus’ Annales,” CAMWS, Waco.
  • 2013 “Derideas Licet: Tacitus’ Death of Seneca as Satire,”  APA, Seattle.
  • 2012 “Ethos Tranlsatum: Failures of Rhetorical Self-Presentation in the Annales of Tacitus,” CAMWS, Baton Rouge.
  • 2011 Panel Respondent, Annual Heartland Graduate Workshop in Ancient Studies, University of Missouri.
  • 2011 “The Quick-Cut in the Annales of Tacitus and the Column of Trajan,” APA, San Antonio.
  • 2007 “Dominus et Deus: Domitian’s Creation of the Games of Capitoline Jupiter,” Forging Identity, Graduate Student Conference, The Johns Hopkins University.
  • 2007 “War More Punic Than Civil: Carthage in Lucan’s De Bello Civile,” CAMWS, Cincinnati.

Publications

Work in Progress

  • Article: “Ethos Translatum: intentional failures of Ciceronian creations of ethos in Tacitus,” currently drafting.

Reviews

  • Shannon-Henderson, Kelly. Religion and Memory in Tacitus' Annals. Oxford University Press, 2019. Classical World, 2020. Invited review.
  • Woodman, A. J., ed.  The Cambridge Companion to Tacitus. Cambridge University Press, 2010. Classical Bulletin, 2012.
  • Galtier, Fabrice.  L’image tragique de l’Histoire chez Tacite: Étude des schèmes tragiques dans les Histoires et les Annales. Latomus, 2011.  Bryn Mawr Classical Review, August 2012.

Currently Teaching

CLAS 414 – Narrating Memory: The Greek and Roman Historians

This course will examine the histories written by ancient Greeks and Romans, as well as the broader questions of historiography. What did history mean to the ancients, and what techniques did they use to "bear witness" to the past? How do the writings of ancient historians inform our understanding of classical antiquity? Ancient Greek and Roman historians to be covered include Herodotus, Thucydides, Livy, and Tacitus.

CLAS 498H – Honors Thesis

An honors thesis is required of all the students graduating with honors. Students ordinarily sign up for this course as a two-semester sequence. The first semester the student performs research under the supervision of a faculty member; the second semester the student writes an honors thesis.

An honors thesis is required of all the students graduating with honors. Students ordinarily sign up for this course as a two-semester sequence. The first semester the student performs research under the supervision of a faculty member; the second semester the student writes an honors thesis.

CLAS 514 – Narrating Memory: The Greek and Roman Historians

This course will examine the histories written by ancient Greeks and Romans, as well as the broader questions of historiography. What did history mean to the ancients, and what techniques did they use to "bear witness" to the past? How do the writings of ancient historians inform our understanding of classical antiquity? Ancient Greek and Roman historians to be covered include Herodotus, Thucydides, Livy, and Tacitus.

Graduate-level requirements include the responsibility for reading large sections of the ancient authors in their original languages. There will be two language exams over these sections, during which graduate students will not only translate but provide limited commentary on the passage provided.

LAT 401 – Latin Reading Course

Readings in one of the following: epic, lyric, drama, history, oratory, satire, epistles, novel, philosophical, technical or medieval literature.

CLAS 335 – The Roman Empire: Rulers and Ruled

In this course, we will examine Rome and its Empire from several points of view and across Roman history. During this semester we will deal with those who ruled the empire, and those who were ruled by the Emperors. Through this class, we will explore how Romans thought about their own rule, and how citizens, subjects, and outsiders reacted to (and against) the Roman Empire.

LAT 426 – Roman Historians

Readings in Latin from the Roman historians and biographers. May be repeated without duplication of readings.

LAT 526 – Roman Historians

Readings in Latin from the Roman historians and biographers. May be repeated without duplication of readings. Graduate-level requirements include extensive readings and a research paper.

LAT 112 – Intensive Beginning Latin

Intensive study of basic morphology, syntax, and vocabulary of beginning Latin. Latin 112 is the equivalent of Latin 101 and 102 OR Latin 112A and Latin 112B; the pace is fast and the workload necessarily demanding. Students who successfully complete the course may advance to Latin 212 in Summer Session II, or Latin 201 in the fall term.

LAT 212 – Accelerated Latin II

Equivalent of LAT 201 and 202. Reading and composition, prose and poetry.